The first community of monks at Ripon included St Cuthbert , who later became Bishop of Lindisfarne. When the monks of Lindisfarne left their monastery in the ninth century because of repeated Viking raids, carrying the body of St Cuthbert with them, their wanderings in the north of England brought them for a while to the monastery of Ripon. But it is Wilfrid who is Ripon’s principal saint, the  refounder of the monastery in the Roman tradition and builder of the Anglo-Saxon stone church. As Bishop of Northumbria from 664 until his death in 710, he was a powerful figure in the history of Christianity in Northumbria in particular, in England more widely, and an effective supporter of the mission to the Low Countries. The cathedral is now dedicated jointly to St Peter (Wilfrid’s original dedication) and to St Wilfrid himself. His wealth of connections mean that Ripon also has close associations with many other Anglo-Saxon saints, including Hild of Whitby, Etheldreda of Ely, Chad, Willibrord, known as ‘The Apostle of the Frisians’, and Benedict Biscop and Ceolfrith, the great scholar-abbots of Monkwearmouth and Jarrow, where Bede, the leading scholar of the early Middle Ages, spent a lifetime of study.